Carolyn Zaumeyer Nurse Practitioner LowTE Florida 4540 N. Federal Highway Fort Lauderdale, FL 33308 954.791.4498 lowteflorida.com When long-term couples approach an end to their hormonal honeymoon and the phases of menopause and andropause begin to have a marked negative impact on sexual function and intimacy, the combined disruption can have a significant...

The only nonprofit organization in Palm Beach County devoted to the educational success of youth in the foster care system has announced plans for its annual fundraiser. Best Foot Forward, co-founded more than a decade ago by Donna Biase and Debbie Ellman, presents the Sole...

Twist of Fate: When Rosana Friederichs signed up for classes in 2019 to attend Miami International University of Art & Design, her intent was to pursue an interior design degree—which, similar to her move from fashion to prop styling, felt like a natural extension of the work she’d been doing. But a Western art history course connected to prominent figures in Europe changed everything. For an assignment in which students were tasked with painting a portrait of a celebrity or friend based on artist from the period being studied, Rosana decided to paint the Joker (the movie starring Joaquin Phoenix came out in 2019). She chose, as her inspiration, the charcoal sketches of 16th-century Italian mannerist Jacopo da Pontormo, who was known more for his dramatic oil canvases. Her version of the Joker captured the “crazy eyes” that drew her to Pontormo’s sketches, as well as the writing that he included around the perimeter of his portraits. But it was more than that. Rosana had tapped into the pain that she’d been carrying around for the past year. And it was emerging as a distinct, mesmerizing and, at times, haunting artistic style. “I’ve always been an independent and generous spirit,” she says. “But, suddenly, I didn’t have money to pay my bills. One day, in the middle of summer, my air conditioner broke. I remember throwing a tantrum. I was like, ‘What else, God? What else is going to happen to me?’ So, I suffered in 2018. It ended up being a huge life lesson because it humbled me. “But that darkness is still there. I can access it in my art when I need to. And I like that.” It didn’t take long for others to notice that Rosana was onto something. She produced a portrait, unprompted, for one of her classmates, a Russian student named Susanna Alan who remains her friend. Rosana wanted to present it as a gift. But her classmate, recognizing the talent, refused to accept it. “Susanna told me, ‘Don’t you ever give away your paintings for free—promise me that,’ ” Rosana says. “I never forgot those words.” Alan paid Rosana $500. Soon, friends and acquaintances were paying her to do their portraits. “Even my manicurist asked me for one,” she says. By 2021, having launched an Instagram page that featured her work, Rosana was reaching an audience beyond the nail salon.

It’s one thing to suffer for your art, but how many painters are willing to bleed for it? Especially to the extent that Rosana Friederichs does. To be fair, the liquid is more accent than primary color. Still, the native of Brazil incorporates enough of her own blood into works she composes on Bristol paper to require covert arrangements with whatever medical lab is willing to draw a vial for her. “In fact, I need more,” she says, peering at the supply she keeps in the door-side shelf of the refrigerator at her upper-floor condominium overlooking Hollywood Beach. “My stash is running low.” Ironically, it’s that exact sentiment—running low—that, only a few years ago, pushed her in a direction that led Rosana to an improbable and unexpected chapter as a portrait artist. She’s done so with an original style, beyond the blood, that continues to stop enthusiasts of her work in their tracks. In the past year alone, she’s participated in exhibitions that have exposed her pieces to art aficionados in Milan, Italy; the Spanish Canary Islands off the coast of Morocco; and at an art shopping expo in the shadow of the famed Louvre in Paris. “This was never my dream,” Rosana says. “You know how artists work their whole life, building toward something? That’s not me. Painting never crossed my mind. “People ask me how I got these shows and exhibitions. I didn’t aggressively go after anything. They all find me.” Though she’s poised for success with a storyline as the accidental artist, much about her life to this point has prepared Rosana for her moment in the spotlight.

In some ways, Brie Mazin was born to follow a path of enlightenment. Her late grandmother, a published author, wrote about meditation and spirituality. And her mother, who she describes as her best friend, raised Brie with principles steeped in mindfulness. But, in 2008, Brie was...