To help celebrate Valentine’s Day next month, the Lenore Nolan-Ryan Cooking School in Fort Lauderdale offers various Valentine’s Day-inspired choices: No. 1: Catered Affair in Your Own Home Lenore Nolan-Ryan Cooking School offers a four-course luscious dinner with detailed instructions to ensure cooking and cleaning is a...

The healing and overall wellness benefits of floatation therapy receive the big-screen treatment in Fort Lauderdale courtesy of the team behind Float8 Wellness Lounge. Savor Cinema (503 SE Sixth St.) presents an exclusive showing of Floating, a documentary on the subject by filmmakers Bridger Dropp...

The reimagining of waterfront living in South Florida continues with the recent sales launch of Edition Residences Fort Lauderdale, the city’s first luxury-branded residences along the Intracoastal. The vision of Miami-based Location Ventures and Marriott International’s Edition Hotels, the footprint at 551 Bayshore Drive (brought...

In the early 2010s, Ann Monis was working out of an office space owned by a clinician (not a psychologist) whose small team worked with assisted living facilities and nursing homes. Monis complemented her agency work by seeing some of the elderly patients and providing mental health services for depression, anxiety and trauma. The business owner, who was planning to retire, called her into his office one day and asked if she wanted to buy the practice. By 2013, Monis had purchased the business and launched Mental Health Center of Florida, combining the elder-care work with her government agency cases. But along the way, she gained more than just a new company and additional employees. “I didn’t have two pennies to scrape together at the time,” Monis says. “But he said he’d finance it for me, and that started a contract negotiation. What I [soon learned] was that he was trying to sell me a company that wasn’t worth anywhere near [the asking price]—which is why he picked the new girl in the office to pitch it to.” A lawyer with whom Monis was familiar helped her to review the contract and the business. The problem was that the company needed to be restructured; billing had been set up incorrectly, leading to potential federal violations. After arriving at a number that was still “a gross overpayment,” Monis went ahead with the purchase. “I understood that I needed to make a move [in order to grow her practice],” Monis says. “My heart was still in helping children and families, but serving the elderly population provided a great marriage. We were treating vulnerable populations, young and old. It was the full spectrum. Clinically, I was so excited about where we were going. “Administratively? Operationally? I was in absolute panic mode. It was a circus.” And with good reason. The business she’d purchased was stuck in the 20th century. Billing was done by hand. Accountants were scribbling payments into ledgers. Clinicians were handwriting sloppy notes and slapping them into folders. Nothing had been digitized. Monis changed everything. She transitioned the business to electronic records. She hired a health care attorney (who’s still with the company). She hired a billing company (also still with the company). “Most of the existing staff left; the change was too overwhelming for them,” Monis says. “In the end, I could’ve just started a business like this on my own. It wasn’t worth the money I paid. “But it was worth the experience and the knowledge that it gave me to understand the system—and build upon it.” Today, a business that started with a staff of seven now employs approximately 100 people in three states. In addition, Transformative Healthcare Solutions serves more than 350 nursing homes/assisted living facilities.